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California Manufacturing Technology Consulting (CMTC) California

Written by: Craig Scharton, CMTC Solutions

The first two questions that I am often asked are:

1) What is CMTC?

CMTC is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. We are primarily funded through the U.S. Department of Commerce and the State of California. We are part of a national network of organizations (Manufacturing Extension Partnership) that is focused on helping manufacturers. CMTC is the entity that is focused on connecting California’s manufacturers to resources.
President Reagan and Senator Hollings helped to create this network because they found that there were many programs to help the manufacturing sector, but few knew that these programs existed. Just as there are extension agents in agriculture, we are client advisors for small to medium-sized manufacturers.

2) What is a manufacturer?

People often imagine big industrial buildings with welders and conveyor belts. But really, a manufacturer is a business that makes a product. Wineries and breweries are manufacturers. An almond farmer who packages her own seasoned nuts is a manufacturer. We have clients who make a product in their garage or kitchen and we have clients who make parts for fighter jets. Sometimes we even have clients who didn’t know that they were a manufacturer like a restaurant that makes salsa or salad dressing as a side business.
The first thing that I recommend to any manufacturer is to set up an Assessment and a Plan of Action with one of our two incredible, local experts. The assessment takes 1-2 hours of the business’ time and is free. One of our resources has a financial background and the other has an operational background. The manufacturer can choose whichever they think would be the most helpful. Our financial expert is a C.P.A who is also a Chief Financial Officer for several companies. The Operations expert has run manufacturing plants around the world and is a mechanical engineer, with an M.B.A. in Management and is a Black Belt in Lean manufacturing. We are very fortunate to have this level of expertise available to help our local manufacturers.

Regions of Service

My region is the Central Valley, from Tulare County up to San Joaquin County, and over to the Nevada state line. I have experienced colleagues that can help if you are in another part of the state, I’m always happy to make the introduction. It’s a great group of people who, like me, really enjoy helping our businesses.

Beyond the 60+ people who work for CMTC, we also have over 150 trainers and consultants who also help our manufacturing clients. We’ve added quite a few in the Central Valley so that we can pair local professionals with our local businesses. As I look up at my dry erase board, I see local companies who will be using local consultants and trainers to help with: ISO 9001 certification, High Performing Teams training, English as a Second Language, Lean Manufacturing, SQF/HACCP for food safety and audits, SolidWorks training, and forklift safety. Those are just the ones on my current To Do list!

In Fresno County, I work very closely with the Fresno Regional Workforce Development Board (FRWDB). The FRWDB has prioritized training for manufacturing businesses. This business-focused organization works closely with our clients to help their businesses to grow by helping to underwrite the cost of improving the skills of their employees. This is a huge win for our community because the businesses are stronger, and their employees have more skills that can help them to grow in their careers.

CMTC also has formal partnerships with two outstanding local organizations, the San Joaquin Valley Manufacturing Alliance and the Water, Energy, Technology (WET) Center at Fresno State. The SJVMA and WET Center provide many great resources for their respective (and often overlapping) members. We work with many other agencies from EDCs to community colleges, the SBDC and city and county economic development departments.

While I like to find resources to pay for some or all of the training or consulting costs for a client (depending on the business location, size and sector) I often provide other services to help our businesses. I helped one client to find a lender to help them to buy their building. I’ve helped others by connecting them to a consultant to help them get a Research and Development Tax Credit. Often I help by connecting two local manufacturers who can help each other meet supply chain needs locally.

Many manufacturers also use our services as a neutral, third party provider. We can analyze a business’ cyber security needs or which types of technology will help them to become more automated. We often evaluate which type of ERP system a manufacturer needs. Because we aren’t selling a product or software, we can assess a company’s needs and make recommendations and present options.

Love of Local


Hopefully, you can read my enthusiasm for helping our local businesses. It’s been a passion of mine for over three decades. Many of the problems that we face in our region are the result of the disconnection between the resources and the need. Businesses don’t have the time to start calling government agencies to find out which programs might be helpful to them. The programs are often buried deep inside a division within an agency within a department. Even if the business owner managed to find the programs, they wouldn’t know how to find out which was the right one for their needs. This is where I come in. I learn about the resources so a business can find out which programs fit their needs.

Business leaders are often the type of people who like to forge ahead and solve every problem on their own. They often forget to look around to see how many resources there are to help them, their business, and their employees. But it is important to use every resource to help your business to grow. There are many forces making it difficult to operate a business, so it is imperative to take advantage of the programs and services that are here to help. These resources come and go, so stay informed so that you can use them while they are available and find out what the next opportunities are on the horizon.

Finally, local businesses should be supporting other local businesses, if we want our economy to grow. Consider using a local bank. Look around to see if you could source parts or materials in our region. Use a local web designer or mechanical engineer (we have both). Attend some local trade meetings to find out what other manufacturers are doing, so maybe you could connect them to a customer, too. Find local wine or chocolate to give as gifts to your clients. I believe that we have all of the resources that we need, it’s up to us to figure out how to make them work for us effectively.


I’m happy to schedule a zoom meeting with any manufacturers in our region to see if CMTC can be helpful. Please send an email to me at cscharton@cmtc.com